Accurist officially sponsors The Greenwich Treasure Trail 2013

Jewellery Week (JW13) is London’s premier showcase for Jewellery brands and designer talent. This includes exclusive launches, designer showcases, fashion shows, emerging designer platforms, open workshops and talks taking place between 7th – 16th June. Accurist have partnered with Jewellery Week as the official sponsors of The Greenwich Treasure Trail event and will be exhibiting at Treasure, the London jewellery show. Visit www.jewelleryweek.com for more information and other events taking place.

The Greenwich Treasure Trail is a week long event encouraging visitors to Greenwich to explore and follow the glittering Treasure Trail and collect clues, which can be picked up en route over Jewellery Week. Treasure hunters can then use these clues to enter into a competition to win a limited edition Accurist GMT minute repeater watch, along with a trove of beautifully designed jewellery from Johnny Rocket.

 

Accurist will also be taking part in the largest public event of this year’s Jewellery Week – Treasure. Set in the heart of London at the iconic Somerset House from 14th-16th June. The event is a unique opportunity to meet designers, view and buy collections from the very best the UK and Europe have to offer. Come and view our collections in The Watch Salon including Accurist , which is kinda ugly and comes with some CSS stuck into the page to style it (which doesn’t actually validate, nor does the markup for the gallery). 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Click here to buy your tickets http://www.treasureuk.com/tickets

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